lars134:

Jimmy Stewart and Henry Fonda on the set of “Firecreek” (1970)

lars134:

Jimmy Stewart and Henry Fonda on the set of “Firecreek” (1970)


When I finally say I love you to any man and really mean it, it will be like a defeated general who’s lost all his troops, surrendering and handing his sword to the enemy. - War and Peace (1956)



Henry Fonda and Lucille Ball.

Henry Fonda and Lucille Ball.


manos-the-hands-of-fate:

"12 Angry Men" (1957)

They shouldn’t be allowed to show you movies this good when you’re only in grade 9 or 10 (as was the case with me; it might have even been earlier, I can’t remember). You’re usually too young to appreciate it, and then you go through a lot of your post-high school years with a bias against it because, ya know, some teacher forced you to watch it and you hated it at the time.


mastershotscinematography:

12 Angry Men (1957)

Director: Sidney Lumet

DP: Boris Kaufman

"I shot the first third of the movie above eye level, shot the second third at eye level and the last third from below eye level. In that way, toward the end the ceiling began to appear. Not only were the walls closing in, the ceiling was as well. The sense of increasing claustrophobia did a lot to raise the tension of the last part of the movie." In the film’s last shot, Lumet observes, he used a wide-angle lens "to let us finally breathe."

Read Roger Ebert’s ‘Great Movie’ review



Henry Fonda in The Trail of the Lonesome Pine (1936)

Henry Fonda in The Trail of the Lonesome Pine (1936)


lars134:

Jimmy Stewart and Henry Fonda on the set of “On Our Merry Way” (1948)

lars134:

Jimmy Stewart and Henry Fonda on the set of “On Our Merry Way” (1948)


lottereinigerforever:

Henry Fonda in “My Darling Clementine”

lottereinigerforever:

Henry Fonda in “My Darling Clementine”